Artist trading cards
e-Magazines - Issue 17 (Dec 2008) (Public)
Monday, 01 December 2008 18:00

Cupcake themed artist trading cards take centre stage when a group of stamping friends across the country create and swap out their treasures so lovingly made.

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Artist Trading Cards (Intro Image)

About artist trading cards
As their name indicates, ATCs are collectables, an idea born of the older sports-themed trading cards commonly available in America. The one rule that makes an ATC derive from their origins are that the dimensions of the ATC must be 2.5 Inch x 3.5 Inch (64mm x 89mm). There are however a few rules that can be changed. First, an ATC must not be sold, only exchanged, as the whole essence of these tiny works of art is about artists meeting (by correspondence or online if need be) and exchanging their works, thus meeting many artists and getting exposed to many personal styles of art. Secondly, on the back of each ATC the artist writes part of or all of the following information: name, contact information, title of the ATC and a number in sequence such as 4 of 8 (4/8) if it's part of an edition. By definition ATCs are made in limited numbers, often no more than one of a kind. Unique ATCs are called originals; sets of identical ATCs are called editions and are numbered; sets of ATCs that are based on one theme but that are different are called a series. What most collectors really want when entering into a swap are cards that were made with care. Based on that, numbers are meaningless. That's all! The above is all you need to know to start making your own ATCs. Common sense dictates that they should be sturdy enough to survive mailing, and of reasonable thickness, unless you specifically want them otherwise. Transparent card sleeves are useful to protect the cards if need be and used for filing and storing cards in files. ATC cards are generally placed inside a plastic packet when posted to prevent it from getting dirty or damaged.

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Claudine Pienaar

Claudine Pienaar
Claudene's colour scheme is pure yum! She used a patterned paper matted on top of plain cardstock as her base card and rounded the corners. Her cupcake is made out of die-cut cardstock and finished off with glitter glue around the edges and delicately inked edges for definition. A red cherry covered in glaze adds the last touch of pure delight.

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Jowilna Nolte

Jowilna Nolte
Jowilna created a painted background piece with printed book paper and a stamped piece of acetate layered on top. The cupcake image was stamped onto white cardstock, cut out and then coloured using water colours, dimensional glaze and puff paint. The card is finished off with a delicate bow, brad and diamond.

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Benice Basson

Benice Basson
With her signature style of using serviettes in her work Benice created a beautiful base using a printed cupcake serviette. She added some stamped details, glitter glue and liquid pearls to define her cupcakes. A real miniature birthday candle is used as accent with four purple brads on either side keeping it all in place.

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Ilse McCarthy

Ilse McCarthy
Ilse kept with a monochromatic colour scheme in pink of different shades for her ATC card. A stamped cupcake is layered on top of a darker pink decorative matt using a sugar coated brad. She used glitter glue to highlight the sprinkles on the icing and to tie in with the brad. A sentiment stamped at the bottom of her card finishes it off.

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Joanna Gordge

Joanna Gordge
For her ATC card Joanna used a lot of textured cardstock in different colours to create a paper pieced cupcake. Glitter glue was used to create the icing and sprinkles on top of the cardstock. A beautifully printed 'bubble' filled with text in the same colours was placed above the cupcake. A strip of ribbon finishes off the card.

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Penny Goument

Penny Goument
A fun and playful polka dot background was used as background for two colourful cupcakes. Penny used her Cuttlebug to emboss and create texture on the top part of her cupcakes. She used different ink pads to add colour to her die-cut pieces as well as around the edges. A check pattern heart and stamped word is used as finishing.

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Amanda Harrod

Amanda Harrod
Amanda used a stunning combination of pink, bronze and purple for her card. A base card of bronze is cut to size and an embossed piece of pink added on top of it. The bronze is repeated in a strip embossed with a swirl and raised using foam tape. Her stamped cupcake is painted and forms the central focal point of her ATC card.

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Niki Zipp

Niki Zipp
Niki used an embossed cupcake on the front of her card. She combined different shades of purples and created interest with torn edges, inking and stamping. The embossed cupcake was raised using foam tape to add dimension. At the back of her card Niki added two tiny little cupcakes done on shrink plastic as accents.

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Angella de Jager

Angella de Jager
Two different colours of cardstock was layered on top of each other to form an interesting and vibrant base for her art work. Angella stamped her cupcake onto patterned paper to further add interest and so created an instant pattern on her cupcake. Glitter glue was used as icing sugar and a little porcelain rose is a feminine accent.

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Paula Levi

Paula Levi
Paula created loads of interest on her background by using several layers of patterned paper, cardstock and ribbon pieces underneath her matts. She used masking and layering to create her cupcakes and to colour them in she added puff paint to add a realistic layer of icing sugar with sprinkles. A great way to use up those ribbon scraps.

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Sandra Fullerton

Sandra Fullerton
A single cupcake stamp was used for this card. Sandra stamped her image and then cut it apart so that she could raise the top half of the cupcake using foam tape. This creates dimension. A piece of patterned paper was matted onto purple cardstock with a ribbon border as the base. Stamped swirls, diamantes and glaze finishes it off.

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Lynn Cupido

Lynn Cupido
A vibrant and beautiful card using a strong colour combination of green, pink, red and purple. Lynn stamped her cupcake in black on white cardstock and added colours and textures using paint markers and puff paint. The stamped image was raised to add dimension and a paper rose placed on top to finish off the card.

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Yvette Venter

Yvette Venter
Yvette combined lots of products and techniques on her card for interest and texture. Pastel coloured cardstock and patterned paper was used for her base and then repeated in darker shades on her stamped images. Stamped wording, glitter glue touches, ribbon and a beautiful ribbon flowers add the finishing touches to her card.

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Kim Brackenridge

Kim Brackenridge
Kim used a beautiful fresh colour palette for her cupcake cards. An interesting round cardstock matt was embossed and her stamped cupcake sits on top. She used coloured markers to add soft hues to her cupcake and a red cherry covered in dimensional glaze adds the finishing touch. A printed 'hey cupcake' sentiment is the perfect last touch.

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Lana Cupido

Lana Cupido
A luxurious cupcake filled with texture and dimension in stunning reds and golds. Lana created a dimensional cupcake by recreating the bottom part out of corrugated card and adding a thin strip of silver cord and a gold flower sequence. She used two colours of embossing powder to add interest to her image.

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Debbie Harris

Debbie Harris
Debbie used a beautiful shimmer cardstock that she embossed as her background. On top she layered a gigantic stamped cupcake that is covered in glitter glue and sprinkle shaped diamantes. A red cherry on top of her cupcake offers the perfect touch of contrast in her colour scheme. The image is raised using foam tape.

This article is an online reproduction of page 37-43 of imagine e-magazine issue 17 (December 2008) as released by Studio J Media. The original magazine can be ordered on digital compact disc directly from them on their website. Information shared in this article is deemed correct at the time the original magazine was released and may have become outdated or products referred to unavailable. For the sake of reference the publish date of this online article on our site is the date the original publication was released and times are for internal sorting purposes only.