On the cover
Magazines - Issue 03 (Oct 2007) (Public)
Monday, 01 October 2007 21:00

Bright and beautiful with loads of colour. Melanie de Groot inspires us with her amazingly creative altered book. Using a new range of products manufactured for altered art and Artist Trading Cards, Melanie manages to do what we all wish for – to set the art in scrapbooking free.

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imagine Magazine Issue 3 (October 2007) Cover
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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Photo 1)

Ooh La La by Melanie De Groot
Filled with colour, texture and techniques this altered book has an old world feel. The book consist of adhering pages together and decorating them, towards the back Melanie used match boxes to make little drawers that can be filled with treasures and small gifts. The drawers are surrounded by glued pages covered in a layer of shiny bronze paint. A range of embellishments and prints from the Artchix studio was used. Look out for their products in selected stores.
Flowers by Prima. Paint swatches by Plascon. Chipboard letters by Enmarc. Embellishments by The Artchix. Charms by 7Gypsies. Ribbon by Halbach, 7 Gypsies & Making Memories. Rub-ons by 7Gypsies. Other: Tissue paper, gold leafing, stamps.

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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Close-up 1)
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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Close-up 2)
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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Close-up 3)
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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Close-up 4)
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Ooh La La Altered Book by Melanie De Groot (Close-up 5)

Because altered books and projects allow you artistic freedom you can create your own embellishments and pockets without being judged. A folded envelope mimics a door that has to be opened. A tag with a diamond encrusted crown and ribbon decorates the front of the envelope without being in the way when you want to add hidden photos and letters. Rub-ons are great for adding words, images and patterns to pages. They are won't cover important parts of a page and can be used slap bang in the middle of a project.

Tissue paper in a bold pink adds a splash of colour while adding texture and a sense of mystery. Use tissue paper to cover bold patterned papers – the tissue paper is thin enough to let through writing and images while concealing bold designs that may be distracting. Adhere it with glue that dries clear.

Melanie used a stamped image on a light coloured paper to overlap a stamped image on her book page. Stamping the image twice, once onto the book page and then onto another piece of plain paper. Cut the image on the plain paper into different shapes and then overlap them onto the image on the book page.

This article is an online reproduction of page 12-13 of imagine magazine issue 3 (October 2007) as released by Studio J Media. The original magazine can be ordered in printed form directly from them on their website. Information shared in this article is deemed correct at the time the original magazine was released and may have become outdated or products referred to unavailable. For the sake of reference the publish date of this online article on our site is the date the original publication was released and times are for internal sorting purposes only.